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On

Saturday 10:00 am - 10:30 am

Saturday 10:00 am - 10:30 am

Helpers, not distracters: Online Discussion Boards

Seokyeong University

Bilal Qureshi, Paper Rm H3D Saturday 10:00 am - 10:30 am

EFL writing learners showed a positive attitude towards online discussion boards for three important aspects specifically: a) their feelings of autonomy, b) their writing improvement, and c) enhancing their interpersonal skills. The teachers are recommended to encourage EFL learners to use digital devices as a potential learning resource.
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This study examines the effect of online discussion boards on EFL learners’ motivation towards writing. The current study is part of a doctoral dissertation conducted on undergraduate EFL writing learners at a university in Korea. Data is collected (n=203) through an attitudinal survey and one-on-one interviews with randomly selected participants. Both the survey questionnaire and the interviews covered three important aspects of EFL writing learners’ attitudes specifically: a) their feelings of autonomy, b) their writing improvement, c) enhancing their interpersonal skills. Data analysis suggested that EFL writing learners showed a positive attitude towards online discussion boards for the three categories mentioned. Following the findings given above, a few recommendations are made: (a) That an online interface (e.g. online discussion board) be introduced as an essential component of all EFL writing classes benefiting learners not only in providing pedagogical support through feedback to each other but also in forming a social community for interacting with each other in or outside of the classroom. (b) Learners ought to be encouraged to use their digital devices as a potential resource to enhance their learning. (c) Teachers should encourage learners to participate more in online discussion board communications in order to promote communicative language teaching (CLT).
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Saturday 10:00 am - 10:30 am

Quizlet Live: hacks and tweaks for listening and speaking

Tokai University (Shonan campus)

Rich Bailey, Show and tell Rm H3G Saturday 10:00 am - 10:30 am

Quizlet Live is an easy to use, free, online, collaborative flashcard game that motivates and captivates students. Based on extensive use in the university classroom, come discover and share hacks and tweaks to transform it into a speaking and listening powerhouse, taking it beyond just text recognition.
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Technology and "gamification" are increasingly popular concepts in language learning, and with almost 100% saturation of Internet-connected devices, there are many possibilities for BYOD (bring your own device) teaching to explore. After being introduced to Quizlet Live at JALTCALL 2017, for the last year I have focused on using the free, online, collaborative game from Quizlet, a flashcard-based, study tool (website and smartphone application). In Quizlet Live, teams of three to four students must communicate and negotiate with each other to correctly match a prompt (text, image or sound) with 12 possible answers. Each student’s device screen has the same prompt but only three or four of the answers. During extensive use, I have observed students participating with extraordinary levels of motivation and intensity. Discussion with and written feedback from students have confirmed these observations. In this presentation, I will briefly introduce Quizlet Live and how I used it to introduce new content, review for tests, reward the class for positive behavior or outcomes, etc. I will share specific advice and suggestions based on my successes and failures, as well as compare it to similar quiz tools, Kahoot! and Socrative. However, the main focus will be on different hacks and tweaks of flashcard design and game dynamics to incorporate more speaking and listening of content into the game, taking it beyond just text recognition.
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Saturday 10:00 am - 10:30 am

The Virtual Events of English Language Teacher Associations: Where’s the Active Learning?

Nagoya University of Commerce & Business

Stuart Warrington, Paper Rm H3E Saturday 10:00 am - 10:30 am

This presentation will examine the lack of active learning in virtual events offered by English language teacher associations and some of the underlying reasons for this. Thereafter, attention will be turned to what can be done to improve these events so that active learning is ultimately exemplified within them.
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As a means to provide new services and reach those who cannot afford to pay for and/or attend face-to-face events, more and more English language teacher associations are turning to the use of virtual events such as online conferences and seminars. However, successfully offering of such events has not come without its challenges. Indeed, according to Pilson (as cited in Green, 2015), English language teacher associations are still behind in terms of technological planning and preparation in this area. What is more, the virtual events they offer appear to only succeed in encouraging many of those who join them to be passive attendees rather than active learners (cf. LaBorie & Stone, 2015). To this end, this presentation will examine this current predicament with virtual events offered by English language teacher associations and some of the underlying reasons for it. Thereafter, attention will be turned to what can be done to improve these events so that active learning, as a learner-centred strategy widely promoted in ELT, is ultimately exemplified within them.
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On

Saturday 10:00 am - 11:10 am

Saturday 10:00 am - 11:10 am

Bluff, trick, and lie: teaching communication strategies using One Night Ultimate Werewolf

Kansai Gaidai University

Josh Wilson, Workshop Rm H2D Saturday 10:00 am - 11:10 am

One Night Ultimate Werewolf is a social deduction game featuring hidden roles, bluffing, and deception. Each ten-minute game is a whirlwind communication challenge as learners are forced to think quickly and lie convincingly. In this workshop we’ll play a few rounds and discuss using the game in EFL classes.
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One of the most difficult challenges facing speaking-focused classes is providing activities that force students to speak quickly and react to others rapidly. Even when students are motivated to speak small group discussions can slow to a crawl, losing energy and focus as engagement levels drop. Not so when playing One Night Ultimate Werewolf. This five-minute, hidden-role, social deduction game challenges players to discover their partners’ identities and reveal the werewolves lurking amongst the villagers. In the process learners exercise communication muscles they’ve hardly used before as they bluff, suspect, accuse, lie to, and interrogate each other. Games end with surprise and laughter as identities are revealed, and then it’s time for another round. Just make sure to have a few extra sets of the game ready for those students who will want to play outside of class!

In this workshop participants will be taught the rules of One Night, play a few rounds, then discuss how the game can be used in communication courses. Fifteen minutes at the end of the session will be devoted to open discussion of using board games in the classroom. The app used to guide the game is free, and card templates, rules handouts, and vocabulary worksheets for One Night Ultimate Werewolf will be provided.
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On

Saturday 10:40 am - 11:10 am

Saturday 10:40 am - 11:10 am

The Effects of Flipped Learning on Teaching EFL with ICT and Mobiles

Aoyama Gakuin University

Hiroyuki Obari, Paper Rm H3F Saturday 10:40 am - 11:10 am

Flipped lessons were conducted over a ten-month period during two academic semesters (April 2016 to January 2017) while students were engaged in various kinds of active learning with ICT and mobile technologies. As a result, TOEIC mean score improved from 620 (SD: 126) to 774 (SD: 106).
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Flipped learning (FL) is now also gaining in popularity within L2 learning circles more than ever before through the utilization of a variety of mobile technologies. “Flipping” the classroom is both a pedagogical approach and a theoretical framework rooted in the constructivist and problem-based theories of learning. The study began in April 2016 and ended in January 2017, targeting 26 undergraduates to find out the effectiveness of a flipped learning program incorporating ICT and mobile technologies. The participants were required to complete the course using the emerging technologies and flipped learning materials with their PCs, iPads, and smartphones. The flipped learning activities of this study included the following: (1) students spent extensive time watching the TED Talks with iPads or a smartphone during their commuting hours and later wrote a 300-word summary of one lecture per week; (2) students created PowerPoint presentations and presented the summaries; (3) students used the online program ATR CALL Brix during their free time with the use of ICT and mobile device; and (4) students made special movies about world religions and presented in the class, etc. The students were administered TOEIC as a pre-test in April 2016 and again as a post-test in January 2017. The TOEIC pre- and post-training results (n=26) indicated that the program had assisted the students in improving their overall English proficiency during the 10-month training period from a mean score of 620 (SD: 126) to 774 (SD: 106) with a statistically significant difference at a 1% level.
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Saturday 10:40 am - 11:10 am

Using spectrographic visual feedback in Praat to teach pronunciation

Nagoya Gakuin University

Ryan Barnes, Show and tell Rm H3A Saturday 10:40 am - 11:10 am

This show and tell will demonstrate how students can use Praat to record their own utterances and analyze them using the spectrogram, giving them an extra tool for self-evaluation and autonomy. Additionally, participants will have a chance to experiment with spectrographic visual feedback as a learning and teaching tool.
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Praat (Boersma & Weenink, 2017) is a freely available software program used in analysis of speech in phonetics. Spectrographic visual feedback is a visual representation of speech sounds and can be used for self-diagnosing speech utterances. Although the software is very powerful and has a bit of a learning curve, there are many intuitive features that can be implemented in a language-learning environment, both by students and by practitioners.

This show and tell will demonstrate how students can use Praat to record their own utterances and analyze them using the spectrogram, giving them an extra tool for self-evaluation and autonomy “in a field that has had to rely on native listener judgments traditionally” (Wilson, 2008, p. 115). Additionally, participants will have a chance to experiment with spectrographic visual feedback as a learning and teaching tool.
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Saturday 10:40 am - 11:10 am

Online speech: a demonstration and analysis of speaking with the computer

Kanazawa University / Ishikawa Prefectural University

Gary Ross, Show and tell Rm H3B Saturday 10:40 am - 11:10 am

This talk will demonstrate a free online speech-recognition system. Part One will demonstrate the ability for role playing and drills, having the results graded automatically. Part Two will look at accuracy and usability, with an analysis of student attitudes and motivations based on >1,000,000 graded utterances from a university course.
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Online speech recognition allows students to practice conversations using a PC or mobile device. This represents a major development in how we can implement speaking practice and will have a significant impact on teaching speaking skills, especially in conjunction with the flipped classroom. This talk will demonstrate a system open to anyone to use including attendees, developed by one of the presenters, where students can role-play and drill hundreds of conversations using voices of almost nationality, but also where such conversations are automatically graded and analyzed. The system also allows scaffolding by varying the speed of speech.

Since the system was first developed, it is now in use in several universities, and this talk will also demonstrate the system in use at Ishikawa Prefectural University, and present an analysis of the effectiveness of the system based on well over 1,000,000 graded utterances. Particularly, it will look at the effectiveness of the grading system, technical issues involved in getting students started, plus an analysis of student attitudes and motivations when speaking online.

As the system is open ( http://bloxi.jp/ ), attendees are welcome to join and try out the system themselves during the presentation, and are of course welcome to use the system within their institution after the conference is over.
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On

Saturday 11:20 am - 11:50 am

Saturday 11:20 am - 11:50 am

Learning together apart: exploring learners' engagement in a simulated conference call task.

The Language Center, National I-Lan University

Rosa Huiju Chen, Paper Rm H3C Saturday 11:20 am - 11:50 am

Nowadays advanced online learning technology has allowed multi-sided communicative options for user engagement and interactivity. This study aims at exploring the feasibility of implementing a group video chat task outside the classroom across schools to promote social interaction, learner engagement and online collaborative language learning.
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Given that having ability to organize and lead conference calls with global professional partners has been a common workplace challenge, the reinforcement of learners’ oral communication and social interaction should be primarily considered within the domain of Business English teaching and learning, both in- and out-of-classroom. Moreover, advanced online learning technology has allowed multi-sided communicative options for user engagement and interactivity. This study aims at exploring the feasibility of implementing a group video chat task outside the classroom across schools to promote social interaction, learner engagement and online collaborative language learning. Participants were 61 undergraduate EFL students enrolled in Workplace English courses from two colleges in Taiwan. Provided with a conference call scenario with pedagogical goals, each participant was randomly assigned into small groups (3 to 5 members). Three constructs including task performance, learning engagement, and level of collaboration were measured using analysis of questionnaire and focus group interview data. Results show that participants with higher level engagement had superior task performance and better perceived satisfaction. Furthermore, it was evidenced that participants with well-developed social skills (like conveying one's ideas clearly and having the confidence to start the task) tend to properly handle time management or technological problems before the actual conference scheduled time, mapping exactly to real-life workplace communication tasks. These findings suggest that simulated conference calls had been able to reinforce language class content and to provide more opinions for learning and internalizing skills beyond the campus boundary. Finally, suggestions for materials and pedagogical implications will be discussed.
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Saturday 11:20 am - 11:50 am

Assistive, Disruptive and Cosmetic Technology in Education

Meijo University

Anthony Brian Gallagher, Paper Rm H3G Saturday 11:20 am - 11:50 am

Assistive/Adaptive, Disruptive and Cosmetic Technology in Education. Good Practice and Implementation.
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In a broad sense, assistive or adaptive technology (AT) is any device, piece of equipment or system that helps a person with a disability work around challenges so they can learn, communicate or simply function better. Understanding what AT is and how it works is the first step toward finding the right tools for students. By looking at definitions and examples of AT, I propose a new definition of Disruptive Technology (DT) - based on Christensen "disruptor/disruptee" theory - and define the new term of "Cosmetic Technology (CT)". By developing a decision matrix based on the categorization of technologies and their user interfaces I hope to best guide instructors in implementing the right technology for them and to also guide institutions in their procurement decision by explaining the negative effects of CT and DT on teaching and learning.
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Saturday 11:20 am - 11:50 am

Active reading with CALL

Matsuyama Shinonome College

Linda K. Kadota, Show and tell Rm H3F Saturday 11:20 am - 11:50 am

This presentation introduces ways to use technology to motivate students by actively engaging them in reading, particularly in reading poetry. The use of various multimedia elements (text, sound, video, animation, and graphics) in classroom activities provides more meaningful context, enhancing students' real-world reading skills while aiding in their vocabulary acquisition.
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This presentation introduces ways technology can be used to motivate students to become actively engaged in reading, particularly in the study of poetry. The use of various multimedia elements (text, sound, video, animation, and graphics) in classroom activities provides a more meaningful context for students. Attendees will leave with a better understanding of how multimedia can not only enhance students' real-world reading skills but also aid in vocabulary acquisition.

Multimedia elements can be combined in ways that hold students' attention by stimulating multiple senses simultaneously. They are powerful tools to help students build analytical reading and writing skills, as well as confidence in their own abilities. A fundamental difference between multimedia based learning and the conventional system of learning is that in the conventional system, the book has basic material, which follows its own step-by-step structures, and the contents are accordingly structured. Multimedia provide a mode of learning that is interactive rather than linear. Teachers and learners can choose their own order of investigation. Interactive multimedia learning is like constructing a spider's web, with one idea linked to another, allowing choices in the learner’s path. It is particularly useful in helping students break out of stale, established patterns of thinking in order to develop new ways of looking at things. This is a non vetted sponsored presentation for the JALT Matsuyama chapter.
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Saturday 11:20 am - 11:50 am

Development of an open online English assessment test

Kanazawa University

Gary Ross, Show and tell Rm H3B Saturday 11:20 am - 11:50 am

This talk will demonstrate a free shared system for the purpose of assessing and testing students for class placement and researchers. Users can contribute questions and through a statistical analysis of the answers, a free effective system testing use of English, listening and speaking will be built up.
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The ability to assess students levels is an important goal for researchers, teachers, and institutions. However, at present, although there are online testing systems available often these are time-consuming and thus cannot be used effectively to assess students progress or to appropriately place them. Furthermore, many testing systems that are available online are prohibitively expensive meaning that researchers may spent a significant portion of their budget testing students.

This presentation will demonstrate an online testing system currently in development by the presenter, but open for anyone to use. The key aspect of this system is that other instructors and researchers will be able to contribute questions which in turn will be used in tests. By assessing the difficulty of questions through a statistical analysis of the answers and any known information about the students taking the test, an accurate system will be built up over time that will allow researchers and instructors to accurately and freely assess students of varying levels.

At present the system works with grammar, usage, and listening questions, (i.e. any question that can be graded by multiple choice) but the ultimate goal will be to include a speaking element through speech analysis.

Attendees who bring laptops of mobile devices will be able to use and test the system during the presentation and in their institution after the conference.
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On

Saturday 11:20 am - 12:30 pm

On

Saturday 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

Saturday 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

Design Thinking: Going from Practice to Theory and Theory to Practice

Michigan State University

Leigh Graves Wolf, Plenary Rm H2A Saturday 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

Design Thinking is a term increasingly popular in academic settings. In this keynote, participants will engage in a design thinking exercise and then explore examples of design thinking initiatives in broad and discrete contexts. Finally, we will learn ways to adapt and implement design thinking strategies into individual contexts.
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Design Thinking is a term increasingly popular in academic settings. Design thinking is an iterative process used to solve complex and wicked problems which engages all stakeholders in the process. In this keynote, participants will engage in a design thinking exercise which will help provide an active, embodied and common experience around design thinking. We will then explore examples of design thinking initiatives in broad (university or organization wide) and discrete (classroom) contexts. Finally, we will learn ways to adapt and implement design thinking strategies into individual contexts.
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On

Saturday 1:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Saturday 1:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Dynamic course sharing between LMSs using LTI

Maebashi Institute of Technology

Hideto D. Harashima, Mari Yamauchi, Show and tell Rm H3A Saturday 1:30 pm - 2:00 pm

LTI allows different LMSs to connect directly through Single Sign-on as well as automatically pass grades back to remote systems. An online TOEIC training course accessed through LTI was exploited by students from different universities, including surveys, vocabulary, quizzes, and discussions. The experiment revealed a new horizon in course sharing.
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The trend of online learning in the 21st century is continuing to move toward more openness and sharing, which is represented by the growing number of MOOCs, OCWs, and OERs. Online course sharing for LMSs is also popular, but the courses are usually in an online repository, which requires both downloading and uploaded. Desiring a more dynamic and direct sharing of online courses, the presenters made use of LTI or Learning Tools Interoperability, the IMS Global Consortium standard for tool sharing. Configuring a TOEIC preparation and discussion course in a central server, students of different universities in Japan joined the course remotely from their own institutional LMSs. The LTI course functioned as one learning object or link in each respective remote course from which students directly connected to the target course. The course included a pre-survey on technology learning, vocabulary practice, quizzes, discussions, and a post-survey to measure learning perception changes. The progression was controlled by conditional settings in the course. The grades earned for the total course was automatically sent to the grade book of respective local course. Changes in grades were dynamically seen between the central course and the local course. An analysis on the two surveys revealed how the students’ perceptions changed over the time. Course sharing through LTI was tested as functional between different LMSs such as Moodle and Blackboard or Moodle and edX, and we believe it has a great potential for the future of LMS learning.
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Saturday 1:30 pm - 2:00 pm

High Performance Extensive Reading- Yes They Can!

Miyagi Gakuin Women's University

Cory J. Koby, Paper Rm H3H Saturday 1:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Students in our English department are in a dedicated extensive reading program which requires them to read at least 415,000 words to pass. Specific methods employed to motivate learners to achieve successful outcomes using an ER-specific LMS called XReading will be demonstrated, including student reading verification and convenient data collection.
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Extensive Reading (ER) is a well known and widely practised approach to L2 education (Waring, 2011). This presentation will describe the methods and approaches followed by one ER practitioner responsible for establishing and managing an ER program for all English majors at one Japanese university. With an ambitious minimum reading threshold set at 415,000 words, and an ultimate goal of reading over 1,000,000 words over the two years, the presenter created a program intended to cultivate and nurture L2 readers—scaffolding the development process right from the beginner (extensive) reader level. Based on Furukawa’s (2006) method, the program makes use of the Start with Simple Stories (SSS) approach which requires all students, regardless of ability, to follow a structured reading path of prescribed reading volumes, at yomiyasusa reading levels established by Furukawa’s Scientific Education Group (SEG). Over the course of this 4-semester program, additional classroom activities have been introduced including, amongst others: timed reading, speed reading, reading aloud, class readers, group discussion, book reviews and recommendations. A Learner Management System (LMS) designed specifically for ER, Xreading, is being used, which also offers access to a digital library of graded readers, supplementing the classroom and school libraries of graded readers. This LMS strengthens the validity of student ER activity by administering short comprehension quizzes, as well as providing program administrators with useful data. Presentation attendees will gain a greater understanding of the methods and LMS the presenter employed which resulted in all 140 participants successfully meeting or exceeding the program targets.
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On

Saturday 1:30 pm - 2:40 pm

Saturday 1:30 pm - 2:40 pm

How to increase your students' TOEIC and TOEFL scores with WordEngine

Lexxica - DMP

Guy Cihi, Workshop Rm H2B Saturday 1:30 pm - 2:40 pm

One third of TOEIC/TOEFL words are infrequent in general English. WordEngine quickly teaches these specific words; improves overall English comprehension, and helps your students score higher on these tests. Learn how the WordEngine mobile learning system will unlock your students' full potential. Only 975 yen per student, per semester.
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Corpus analysis reveals one third of all words in all parts of TOEIC and TOEFL are infrequent in general English usage. That's right, every TOEIC and TOEFL test includes hundreds of low-frequency words that are not covered in any traditional EFL/ESL study materials. It is important to understand that these tests must recycle the same low frequency words in their 'more difficult questions' in order to maintain overall scoring reliability. Your students can quickly learn these specific low-frequency words, and use that knowledge to not only score higher but also improve their four-skills proficiency and general sense of satisfaction with English. This workshop will cover how to start a WordEngine program at your school; how to effectively motivate students to complete their weekly self study goals (aka homework), and how to integrate their individual vocabulary progress into your classroom and grading. The WordEngine high-speed vocabulary system operates on all mobile devices and computers and costs just 975 yen per student, per semester. Make WordEngine part of your overall strategy for success.
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On

Saturday 2:10 pm - 2:40 pm

Saturday 2:10 pm - 2:40 pm

10 things (and reasons) for teachers to blog

HelloSpace.Me

Andrew Blyth, Show and tell Rm H3A Saturday 2:10 pm - 2:40 pm

Should teachers and academics take up blogging? According to Bruder (2013) and Lupton et al (2017), absolutely! But how? Here are 10 things (and reasons) for teachers to blog. The presentation includes suggested blog platforms, types of blog posts, simple writing structures, how to grow a readership, and more.
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The blogosphere can be daunting to the uninitiated because of an uncertainty of how to participate. There are many reasons to take up blogging personally; however, this workshop focuses on the education-related and career benefits for teachers (Bruder, 2013). Additionally, there is a push by academics like Lupton, Mewburn, and Thompson (2017) for researchers to meaningfully engage with online communities via blogs. For teachers, blogging has many benefits including promoting learner autonomy (Schwienhorst, 2011), blended learning with the use of multimedia (Beatty, 2010; Walker & White, 2013), and using the blog as a centralised learning resource and textbook substitute (Stanley, 2013). Furthermore, blogs are often cited as a means for professional development where the writing process assists in reflective teaching practice (Murugaiah, Azman, Ya’acob, & Thang, 2010; and Walker & White, 2013); also, for communication with colleagues and/or parents. Importantly, blogs are used in creating and managing an online reputation that can assist in career development (Lupton et al, 2017). Also discussed is practical information on best blog platforms to use, the types of blog posts to write, simple writing templates to use, how to make content attractive and grow a readership, ethical considerations for educators (Blyth, 2015), among other topics. The presentation will end with a blog topic brainstorming session to help teachers get started. Participants do not need to bring or use any devices.
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Saturday 2:10 pm - 2:40 pm

Digital Evaluation of Analog Work

University of Shimane

Stephen Henneberry, Show and tell Rm H3B Saturday 2:10 pm - 2:40 pm

This presentation looks at different methods of processing handwritten student work, whether in essay, journal, or worksheet form, using digital tools. Different tools and methods will be discussed to provide the audience with a variety of options for implementation in their own situations.
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This presentation looks at different workflows for processing handwritten student work, whether in essay, journal, or worksheet form, using digital tools. Such workflows allow for students to maintain possession of their work for review and portfolio building while also allowing the teacher to maintain a similar portfolio for assessment and feedback. The workflows discussed will include use of cell phones, iPads, Apple Pencil, portable scanners, and more. There are far too many apps, online sharing tools, and other methods to allow for any definitive solutions to be offered, but the pros and cons of some free and paid solutions will be discussed. This methodology is an evolving work-in-progress, so all questions, suggestions, and solutions are welcome during this show and tell.
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On

Saturday 2:50 pm - 3:20 pm

Saturday 2:50 pm - 3:20 pm

Working round LMS imperfections to run a writing course from a tablet.

Shirayuri University

Tim Knight, Show and tell Rm H3A Saturday 2:50 pm - 3:20 pm

This will focus on the challenge of managing a writing course through the Learning Management System 'Schoology'. At first, the presenter did not appreciate the scale of its imperfections, when returning marked papers from a tablet. However, in response to student comments, ways to circumvent the problem were worked out.
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The presenter will focus on the challenge met when integrating the use of a cloud-based Learning Management System (LMS) into the management of an academic writing course. Seduced by the undoubted benefits of using the LMS Schoology, largely through its fully-fledged mobile app, at first the presenter did not appreciate the scale of its imperfections when marking students’ papers and returning them from a tablet. Students opening their work on a computer were often confused by the teacher’s markings on their work 'moving'; that is, not appearing where they should have done. However, working in a blended learning environment, the presenter took on board student comments both in class and in response to surveys, and worked out a way to largely surmount the problem. The problem, student comments, and how the use of screenshots saved the situation, will be fully reported. With so many Learning Management Systems to choose from, the challenge for teachers with little or no institutional support and/or little technological expertise is to choose the most suitable one. For managing an academic writing university course, the presenter has found Schoology to have clear benefits for teacher and students. The key benefit has been to help meet what Paul Kei Matsuda (2012) calls “one of the most important writing strategies…to divide and conquer - make the task into smaller chunks so that you can actually manage them.” Another has been its dedicated apps for both iOS and Android mobile device systems.
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Saturday 2:50 pm - 3:20 pm

Speaking homework using Google Drive on smart phones

Tokai University (Shonan campus)

Rich Bailey, Show and tell Rm H3B Saturday 2:50 pm - 3:20 pm

Smart phones and Google Drive were used to create a system for speaking homework (two semesters, four different classes, 120 students). The requirements and logistics, as well as other options, will be discussed, focusing on providing the understanding and ability to appropriately implement it in the classroom.
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As technology has advanced over time, the options for speaking homework have multiplied and improved from cassette tapes to uploading to the Internet. However, there are still equipment and logistical issues that discourage teachers and students from exploring the full potential. Teachers are understandably reluctant to commit to something new that is potentially complicated and time consuming. As part of ongoing exploration in how mobile technology can more easily and effectively improve language teaching and learning, this presentation will examine the use of smartphones and Google Drive (a free, file storage and synchronization service) to create, gather and assess audio recordings. Based on using this system to assign weekly- and biweekly-speaking homework in four university English classes over two semesters (a total of 120 students), the presenter will discuss the requirements and logistics of creating the system, introducing it to the students, managing and improving the process, and assessing the results. The presenter will also address related issues such as Internet security, privacy, and student concerns about data usage, as well as discuss other possible options for the same process (Dropbox and Send to Dropbox). Attendees will leave with a thorough understanding of the pros and cons of this system and with the knowledge to implement it in their own classrooms.
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Saturday 2:50 pm - 3:20 pm

Active Learning for Any Level with Animation and Comics Online

Matssuyama University

Ian Brown, Show and tell Rm H3C Saturday 2:50 pm - 3:20 pm

This presentation introduces four Web 2.0 websites suitable for any level student. They produce animated movies or traditional pane comics with dialogue text bubbles, text to speech or recorded voice. Simple to use for professional output from templates, they allow concentration on primary language tasks without technological tribulations.
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CALL is full of activities for higher-level students. However, when it comes to lower-levels, finding relevant, appropriate active activities is far more challenging. Teachers become disillusioned with activities beyond their students’ level. This presentation will introduce four Web 2.0 websites ideal for active learning creating interesting, motivating activities suitable and stimulating for any level student. All four websites provide simple, intuitive templates allowing students to simply create professional looking output, whilst concentrating on the primary task of creating short action dialogue stories or presentations in English. Output can vary from text balloons, text to speech, to recorded voice. ‘Make Beliefs Comix’ allows students to create traditional 3 or 4 pane comics. ‘Dvolver’ creates short animations with dialogue bubbles and background music. ‘Go Animate’ allows the creation of even more complex and varied animation movies with text to speech output. Finally, ‘Voki’ creates animated avatars with output choices including recorded voice. Finished projects are saved as web links that can easily be shared in the class in various way for viewing and comment by all class members. These four CALL activities promote active learning and enhance student motivation and satisfaction, create a sense of community, and extend learning beyond the classroom. The presenter will provide examples and task ideas, as well as practical advice on different ways to use these sites, gleaned from over 10 years’ experience with such tasks. CALL can be a reality for any level learner’s active learning with these four vibrant Web activities.
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Saturday 2:50 pm - 3:20 pm

An online system to practice spoken questions and answers

Mie Prefectural College of Nursing (MCN)

Myles O'Brien, Show and tell Rm H3G Saturday 2:50 pm - 3:20 pm

Giving an appropriate, grammatical response to a direct question is often difficult for students of English. The presenter will demonstrate his freely-available online system, with editable vocabulary items, which answers spoken or written questions from a user in a sensible way, in order to facilitate pattern practice.
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Giving an appropriate, grammatical response to a direct question often poses difficulties for students of English. The presentation includes an explanation and live demonstration of the presenter’s online browser-based system for answering questions in a sensible way, in order to facilitate pattern practice. The user’s input may be typed or spoken, and the response can be set to text only, simulated speech only (using the device’s text-to-speech facility), or both. The user’s spoken input is interpreted through Google’s speech recognition function.

The system is quite different from a chatbot in that it concentrates on producing correctly formed answers to a specific range of questions, using a limited vocabulary. Chatbots aim higher at more realistic conversation, and the responses can be amusing but inappropriate, or downright wrong, grammatically.

The system is freely available for download, and comes with a default set of text files containing common vocabulary, classified into verbs, food, drink, places, male names, female names, etc. A teacher can edit the text files before uploading to a website for deployment. Also, users can check and edit the vocabulary contents to their own liking when using the system.

The permitted question types are WH, Yes/No, and OR questions. So, for example, “What did Tom eat?” may give the response “He ate a pizza.” “Where will Janice go?” may give “She’ll go to Paris.” Each verb entry in the vocabulary file should include sensible possible objects and/or categories, to allow a sensible random choice. Categories may be shared with other verbs.
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Saturday 2:50 pm - 3:20 pm

Challenge, motivate, and collaborate in class with new DSB: Digital Student Book

Macmillan LanguageHouse

Darren Halliday, Show and tell Rm H3H Saturday 2:50 pm - 3:20 pm

We are very happy to introduce our brand-new digital component "DSB". The new digital offering for Macmillan "Skillful" and "Breakthrough Plus", has been upgraded to ensure teachers and students effectively integrate the activities and tools found in the page-faithful and digital version of the course book into personalized learning experiences.
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With the aim of improving the teaching experience and students’ interaction with their English language learning materials, we are very happy to give you an overview of our brand-new digital component "DSB". The new digital offering for the Macmillan adult series, "Skillful" and "Breakthrough Plus", has now been upgraded to ensure both teachers and students can effectively integrate the activities and tools found in the page-faithful & digital version of the course book, into personalized learning experiences.
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On

Saturday 3:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Saturday 3:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Activating receptive vocabulary along with their collocations through a blended learning task

Hokkaido University

Ivy Chu-Hui Lin , Paper Rm H3H Saturday 3:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Receptive vocabulary (RV) items of English language learners cause difficulties in language production. Aiming to activate RV along with their collocations, we involved college freshmen ELLs in writing tasks in a blended learning environment. In our presentation, we will demonstrate our learning experiences, and show statistical evidence of their effectiveness.
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Receptive vocabulary (RV) items of English language learners (ELLs) cause difficulties in language production (Nation 1990). Because task-induced writing actives vocabulary through need, search and evaluation (Laufer & Hulstijn, 2001), we involved 101 college freshmen ELLs in writing and saying passages in a blended learning environment to activate RV along with their collocations. We provided a 4-stage learning experience. (1) Instructors assign target RV items and their representative collocations in class. (2) ELLs write passages including target RV items along with collocations of their choice by using a forum on a learner management system (LMS) outside of class. (3) Instructors write feedback on collocation usage on the LMS forum. (4) ELLs say improved passages in class. To raise the awareness of limited word combinations, we showed ELLs the most common collocations for each RV. ELLs received and produced each RV multiple times via conversations in class and written interaction on the LMS forum. We measured the extent of RV activation by using a productive vocabulary level test (Laufer & Nation 1999) before and after the learning periods. Paired-difference tests revealed significant increases in mean scores. We found that RV activation faded over a period of approximately 9 weeks.Vocabulary production without collocations can hinder accurate interpretation (Granger, Paquot & Rayson, 2006). By contrast, because collocations reduce semantic ambiguity, ELLs can reliably convey their intent, and instructors can concentrate on correcting errors. The performance and competence errors we found may imply a deepening of language understanding (Ludeling & Hirschmann, 2015).
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Saturday 3:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Reducing study abroad anxiety through smartphone virtual reality

Aichi Shukutoku University

Chris Hastings, Show and tell Rm H3B Saturday 3:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Virtual reality and smartphone-based activities can be used to potentially reduce learner anxiety prior to studying abroad and provide practical training and knowledge. Examples of these activities, along with the survey data gathered from participating students, will be explored. Attendees will be able to try activities for themselves.
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Students (especially those from largely ethnically homogenous and monolingual countries such as Japan) preparing to study abroad may experience considerable anxiety about the prospect of an unknown foreign environment. The negative consequences of this anxiety may take the form of overcompensation in preparation and study, avoidance of preparation and study, or even physical effects, such as illness. The presenters propose that recently developed smartphone virtual reality, such as Google Cardboard, is a practical and affordable technology that could help train students in problem-focused coping strategies aimed at reducing anxiety. This technology allows anyone with a smartphone and a compatible headset, through the use of freely available applications, to visit locations around the globe and inhabit them immersively with the ability to look freely in all directions. In this presentation, we will discuss a pilot study examining anxiety-reducing VR-based activities as well as other CALL activities, that allowed students to virtually visit their overseas campuses, city downtown districts, and homestay neighbourhoods. In particular, the presenters will talk about the rationale for the study, the activities and materials used in the study, and the data collection methods and results. Also, how these preparatory activities might reduce student anxiety prior to departure will also be explored. Finally, improvements for a larger scale study will be proposed. Attendees will be able to experience the VR activities for themselves. This presentation may be of particular interest to teachers or administrators who wish to use more active learning-based activities in preparing students to study abroad.
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Saturday 3:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Digital projects, digital literacy and language learning: A Japanese university case study

Okayama University and Kobe Shoin Women's University

Neil Cowie, Show and tell Rm H3F Saturday 3:30 pm - 4:00 pm

This paper describes a case study of how one EFL teacher in a Japanese university implemented a blended course with the creation of multimedia slideshows as learning outcomes. The affordances and limitations of creating digital projects are highlighted and issues of evolving teacher-student relations and teacher role are discussed.
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The use of digital technology to create projects such as multimodal texts and digital stories is increasing rapidly in L1 settings. However, there are relatively few EFL studies showcasing such projects, especially within an existing language curriculum. In order to address this gap, the two presenters will describe a case study of how one EFL teacher in a Japanese university implemented a blended course which included the creation of digital projects as a learning outcome. Over a one semester 16-week course students in three classes (N=70) created, both individually and in collaboration with classmates, four three-minute multimedia slideshows which were uploaded and shared on YouTube. The slideshows included text, photographs and other visual items, video and audio. The two presenters independently analyzed data from participant observation, student surveys and interviews, and the projects themselves to provide evidence that a teacher and students with limited expertise in using technology can work together to create skillful and thoughtful multimedia slideshows in L2. The study is, therefore, one that may help other EFL teachers who wish to take advantage of the increasing availability of digital technology to combine language learning with digital literacy. In addition to highlighting the affordances and limitations of teaching with digital technology, issues of evolving teacher-student relations and teacher role and identity are discussed.
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Saturday 3:30 pm - 4:00 pm

A computerized speech assessment plugin for Moodle

Kochi University of Technology

Paul Daniels, Show and tell Rm H3G Saturday 3:30 pm - 4:00 pm

This session will introduce a speech assessment plugin for Moodle to aid in the administration and evaluation of online practice speaking tasks. The plugin enables teachers to author online speaking assignments that can be automatically scored by the computer. Several extensive and intensive speaking tasks will be demonstrated.
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Speaking skills are often highly revered but at the same time are the most difficult skills for language learners to master. Speech anxiety can inhibit students from speaking. Time-intensive speech evaluation can deter instructors from allocating more time for formative speaking activities. To help alleviate these challenges, the presenter has been designing a speech assessment plugin for Moodle to aid in the administration and evaluation of online practice speaking tasks. This open-source plugin enables teachers to author online speaking assignments that can be automatically scored by the computer. Each speaking task can be fully customized by the teacher to include audio, text or image prompts. Student speech can be captured and saved to a Moodle course for human evaluation or it can be transcribed and scored using a built-in speech scoring algorithm. The recording, transcription and scoring of live speech takes place within the Chrome web browser and employs Google’s Web Speech technology for the transcriptions. A variety of extensive and intensive speaking tasks will be demonstrated during the session.
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On

Saturday 4:10 pm - 4:40 pm

Saturday 4:10 pm - 4:40 pm

Apps 4 EFL: Creative commons data and web technologies for EFL

J.F. Oberlin University

Paul Raine, Poster Rm H2E Saturday 4:10 pm - 4:40 pm

In this presentation, the speaker will introduce and demonstrate "Apps 4 EFL", a free, cross-device compatible Web-Based Language Learning (WBLL) platform, wholly developed by the speaker. The site utilizes creative commons data and open web technologies to provide engaging and intuitive English language teaching and learning tools.
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Apps 4 EFL is a free web-based language learning platform, which uses a variety of open web technologies to mold creative commons data into effective and engaging English language learning activities. Activities offered by the site include vocabulary tests, cloze tests, text-to-speech (TTS) dictation, speech recognition (ASR) for the improvement of pronunciation and fluency, real time language learning games, and video comprehension quizzes. The outcomes of these activities can can be easily tracked by teachers, and integrated into assessment procedures and grading rubrics.
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Saturday 4:10 pm - 4:40 pm

Read Theory for university EFL reading practice - perceptions on progress

Miyazaki International University

Cathrine-Mette Mork, Poster Rm H2E Saturday 4:10 pm - 4:40 pm

Read Theory is a free, individualized, online reading platform with an extensive library of reading passages with comprehension questions. It was piloted for two freshmen EFL reading courses in a Japanese university. Progress analysis and questionnaire results completed at the end of each semester are presented in this poster presentation.
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Read Theory (readtheory.org) is a free, online reading practice platform that supplies students with an extensive library of passages catered to individual levels. Learners are assessed on comprehension through a series of multiple choice questions and optional written responses. The system uses algorithms and Lexile (lexile.com) level information to initially place students in the initial reading level assessment and in subsequent reading practices. The questions are designed to improve critical thinking ability as well as an understanding of scope, structure, intention, memory, and vocabulary. Readers move up (or down) in level as they work through Read Theory and detailed answers and explanations after completion of a section are available. Teachers can create class accounts to manage student activity and allow them to view extensive reports giving insights into students’ levels and progress. Although the platform is designed for American K12 readers, adhering to national benchmarks and specified by the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), the system was piloted for two freshmen EFL reading courses in a Japanese university over two semesters. As the structure of typical Read Theory sessions resembles that of the university’s final exams for reading courses, it was hoped that the system would provide an opportunity to familiarize students with the exam format in addition to improving their reading skills and providing them with a tool for future self-directed learning. Questionnaires addressing student perceptions were completed at the end of each semester, and student progress in the system was analyzed. Results are presented in this poster presentation.
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Saturday 4:10 pm - 4:40 pm

The effectiveness of using Facebook to improve English writing abilities

Hiroshima University

Joe Lauer, Poster Rm H2E Saturday 4:10 pm - 4:40 pm

What types of writings do students produce on Facebook? A cross-culture writing exchange program using Facebook was carried out between undergraduate students in Japan and Spain. The students’ writings were linguistically analyzed. The results, and those of other similar projects, will be explained in detail.
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Three undergraduate classes in Japan and three in Spain, totaling about 50 students in each country, recently carried out a cross-culture writing exchange program using Facebook. The primary goal of the project was to increase the students’ enjoyment of English, by giving them opportunities to use English in real on-line communication. This poster presentation will focus the linguistic output of the students: What types of Facebook writings did they produce? It was found that the Japanese students’ most frequent grammar errors involved articles (the/a), while the Spanish students tended to use inappropriate vocabulary expressions. These results will be explained in detail along with the results of other similar Facebook projects.
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On

Saturday 5:00 pm - 6:10 pm

Saturday 5:00 pm - 6:10 pm

The Internet of things and its implications for language education & research

Keynote Speaker

Hayo Reinders, Keynote Rm H2A Saturday 5:00 pm - 6:10 pm

In this talk I will describe the Internet of Things from a pedagogical point of view, give some examples of emerging implementations and research, and propose three areas of potential impact on our field clustered around affordances relating to mobility, augmentation and ubiquity.
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It is estimated that by 2020 there will be over 50 billion connected devices. This will go beyond cellphones and computers, to include objects such as cars, household appliances, and – as the technology improves – clothes, utensils and all manner of everyday items. What does this have to do with language education? As with computers and mobile technologies, the implications and uses of these developments for educators may not be obvious, but they are likely to be significant. In this talk I will describe the Internet of Things from a pedagogical point of view, give some examples of emerging implementations and research, and propose three areas of potential impact on our field clustered around affordances relating to mobility, augmentation and ubiquity. I will argue that these can facilitate the implementation of truly active learning and give some practical suggestions for language teachers in Japan.
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On

Sunday 9:30 am - 10:00 am

Sunday 9:30 am - 10:00 am

Osaka University Global English Online: The Design and Development Phases

Osaka University

Parisa Mehran, Mehrasa Alizadeh, Poster Rm H2E Sunday 9:30 am - 10:00 am

This poster presentation focuses on the design and development phases of an EGAP online course at Osaka University. Initially, ADDIE and SAM models of online instructional design will be reviewed. Following that, the intertwined design and development phases of the prospective online course will be explained in detail.
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As part of a work in progress, this poster presentation focuses on the design and development phases of an online course of English for General Academic Purposes (EGAP), which has been referred to as Osaka University Global English Online. Initially, two mainstream models of instructional design for online course delivery—namely, ADDIE and SAM—will be briefly reviewed. The ADDIE model is a generic, systematic, linear, step-by-step process, known as waterfall model, which consists of five ordered phases: (1) Analysis, (2) Design, (3) Development, (4) Implementation, and (5) Evaluation. Unlike ADDIE’s five giant sequential steps, SAM (Successive Approximation Model) is an iterative, cyclical, and agile approach to instructional design which tries to address the roadblocks in the way of instructional designers in repeated small steps. Following that, the intertwined design and development phases of the prospective online course will be explained in detail, which include the following: Assessing students’ needs and technological skills, defining the course overall goal and learning objectives, determining online course technologies, requirements, accessibility, connectivity, and support system, developing course syllabus, instructional materials, tasks and activities, objective-based assessment, management strategies for team teaching, and formative and summative course evaluation. Copyright restrictions, the use of Open Educational Resources (OERs), as well as several e-learning authoring tools and their merits and demerits will also be discussed. Finally, issues related to quality assurance will be touched upon with reference to the Quality Matters Higher Education Rubric.
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Sunday 9:30 am - 10:00 am

Engaging students through video capture

Konan University, Hirao School of Management

Roger Palmer, Poster Rm H2E Sunday 9:30 am - 10:00 am

This poster presentation elucidates ways that free video capture software (such as JING) can be used to help students with their language development. Areas addressed include text deconstruction, analysis of student writing, applications of video capture for personalized feedback, and further possible uses of the video techniques.
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Having students work together for group tasks, the kind of cooperative learning envisaged by researchers promoting Active Learning, is helpful in engaging language learners in classroom activities. Yet there are situations in which it is desirable to take students out of the group, such as when giving individual feedback for iBT TOEFL writing tasks. Time limitations, however, make this extremely challenging for most instructors. To address the problem, this poster displays a simple guide to the process of using video capture to help learners individually when face-to-face meeting time is at a premium. It also discusses several possible benefits of using this kind of approach. Instruction took place between semesters at a private university in Japan where non-English majors have to exceed an iBT TOEFL threshold to gain eligibility for overseas academic exchange. Though the writing section questions were identified as being predictable and fairly straightforward to teach, it appeared that students had performed poorly with these tasks in the past. Areas addressed in the poster include written prompts, text deconstruction, samples of student writing, applications of video capture to give personalized feedback, and further possible uses of video techniques. Results indicate that free software (for example, JING) can be used successfully by instructors to assist learners in their language development.
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Sunday 9:30 am - 10:00 am

Assistive & Disruptive Technology in Learning

Meijo University

Anthony Brian Gallagher, Poster Rm H2E Sunday 9:30 am - 10:00 am

How does the implementation of technology assist or disrupt learning for 1st-year students at a university in Japan?
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This small scale action research reports on student perceptions of their access to and use of technology during their 1st year at university. With a focus group of language students (n=131) who took a writing course and were required to produce word processed documents throughout, their opinions were sought as to the effectiveness of a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) recommendation supplemented by university supplied devices. Students reported on their perceptions of technology both in class and outside of class, virtual learning environments, teacher feedback, and barriers to learning including both teacher and technology issues.
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On

Sunday 10:10 am - 10:40 am

Sunday 10:10 am - 10:40 am

Mobile contents for elementary school English teachers

Nagoya Women's University

Douglas Jarrell, Show and tell Rm H3A Sunday 10:10 am - 10:40 am

The presenters have created special contents for an app called Mobile English. These contents are designed specifically for elementary school teachers and student teachers so that they have more exposure to English and develop the confidence to teach English in English.The app and its contents will be presented.
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Since 2011, Japanese elementary homeroom teachers, together with assistant language teachers (ALTs), have been responsible for English Activities in the 5th and 6th grades. According to a national survey by Japan’s Ministry of Education (MEXT) carried out in 2015, only 5% of homeroom teachers have qualifications showing a sufficient English level to teach the language, and other surveys show that homeroom teachers lack confidence in their English ability. While MEXT does have training programs, their main focus is on pedagogy rather than on improving English skills. To help elementary school teachers and student teachers increase their exposure to English, the presenters have added special content to an existing free app called Mobile English. The content includes simple reading and listening exercises to prepare teachers and student teachers for English activities such as self-introductions and show and tell presentations. Materials also aim to increase pronunciation awareness by focusing on phonics for children. These materials are presently being used by students in a childhood education department at one university, but the presenters hope that the new contents of this app will eventually be used for self-study by the larger population of working elementary school teachers who do not have the benefit of classroom instruction.
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Sunday 10:10 am - 10:40 am

Tips and techniques for teaching with Google Drive and Google Docs

Kansai Gaidai University

Josh Wilson, Show and tell Rm H3B Sunday 10:10 am - 10:40 am

Google Drive and its associated apps is a powerful tool for any language classroom, freeing the teacher and students from the spatial and temporal constraints of paper. This session will cover the following techniques: setting up classes and onboarding students, assessing and giving feedback efficiently, collaborative work, and avoiding pitfalls.
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Google Drive is a powerful tool for the language classroom, freeing the teacher and students from the spatial and temporal constraints of paper. When used correctly the tools allow students to engage more completely with each other, the instructor, and the course materials, enabling students to be more active participants during and outside of class. This session will present practices for using Google Drive and its associated apps garnered from three years of use in university EFL classes with a focus on effective teaching, efficient feedback, and avoiding common pitfalls.

The following will be covered in the session: setting up class folders and course documents will be briefly introduced in the first section. The second section focuses on lessening student anxiety and onboarding users efficiently with three easy activities. The third section provides tips for using commenting functions and writing guides to efficiently assess and give feedback. The final section provides guidelines for using Google Docs and Slides for collaborative projects.
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Sunday 10:10 am - 10:40 am

Reading-while-listening to graded reader audiobooks on mobile devices

Tamagawa University

Brett Milliner, Paper Rm H3C Sunday 10:10 am - 10:40 am

This experimental study was interested in the development of Japanese university EFL learners’ listening skills. Listening development was evaluated for a control group (n=25) and two treatment groups: (1) reading (n=21) and (2) reading-while-listening (n=29), whereby students read or read and listened to more than 100,000 words of graded readers.
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For Japanese and most other students studying English as a foreign language (EFL), they face limited opportunities to engage with English outside the classroom. Over the past decade, a popular approach to overcome this dearth of English input has been the implementation of extensive reading programs. More recently, publishers of graded readers have created audiovisual materials to accompany many of their graded reader titles, and online libraries such as Xreading (www.xreading.com) are making it easier for students to read or listen to graded readers on their personal mobile device. This experimental study is interested in the development of English language learners’ listening skills. More specifically, how increased language input via extensive reading and reading while listening to electronic books/audiobooks affects listening skills. Changes in listening performance were compared among three groups of students (N=75) studying at a Japanese university, namely: (1) a treatment group who read 100,000 words of self-selected graded readers (n=21 ), (2) a treatment group who listened to over 100,000 words of self-selected graded reader audiobooks (n=29), and (3) a control group who did not receive any extra English input (n=25). Listening development was evaluated using TOEIC® and listening vocabulary size test (McLean, Kramer & Beglar, 2015) scores. Results indicated that students who received the reading-while-listening treatment achieved the largest increases in both measures of listening skill development.
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Sunday 10:10 am - 10:40 am

How to make use of eBooks and audiobooks for EFL communicative activities

ex Kwansei Gakuin University

Masami YASUDA, Show and tell Rm H3D Sunday 10:10 am - 10:40 am

eBooks and audiobooks on mobile gadgets have become valuable for reading instruction in CALL and to boost active self-study and reading-aloud of a variety of reading resources. This paper demonstrates how to make use of audiobooks for EFL communicative activities, on iPads and Android tablets and even in BYD setting.
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An increasing number of language teachers are using ICT technologies in CALL. Blending reading and audio listening, in particular, has been a challenge for CALL. eBooks and audiobooks on mobile gadgets have rapidly become valuable for audio based self-study of a variety of reading resources. This paper reports on almost a decade-long action research of mine on adopting eBooks and audiobooks for Japanese EFL classes on a university level. Creating original eBooks and audiobooks is not impossible, but requires certain technical knowledge and consumes time and energy. More and more popular stories are being available in public domain and some are uploaded with human narration to designated servers and on YouTube channels. Using such resources, and preparing blank question form sheets for the class to exchange, I have succeeded in creating good pair work for meaningful communicative activities in remedial classes. I will introduce the rationale for the pilot projects and syllabus designs for audiobook based listening, reading and communication classes. I will share actual classroom-tested lesson plans with a summary of the students' evaluation of such online assignments.
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On

Sunday 11:30 am - 12:30 pm

Sunday 11:30 am - 12:30 pm

Enhancing the CALL experience through Data-Driven-Learning: From words to texts and beyond

Waseda University

Laurence Anthony, Plenary Rm H2A Sunday 11:30 am - 12:30 pm

This presentation looks at recent developments in Data-Driven Learning (DDL) that allow learners in a CALL context to investigate language at the word, multi-word, rhetorical, and discourse level, and also see how people interact to create language, for example, on social media platforms.
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Corpus data and tools have played an increasingly important role in English language teaching and learning research. Native speaker corpora, for example, can provide vocabulary experts with valuable information on word frequencies and distributions, and help inform classroom teachers on appropriate language use in general and specialized contexts. Learner corpora, on the other hand, can help teachers identify common second language learner problems and provide evidence of language growth and development. Nevertheless, the introduction of corpora and corpus tools into the classroom for direct use by learners as part of a Data-Driven Learning (DDL) approach is still a relatively uncommon practice. This is despite an increasing amount of empirical evidence showing that DDL is often more effective that traditional teaching methods. In this presentation, I will first briefly review the long history of research and practice that supports the DDL approach before highlighting some of its obvious weaknesses and limitations in a CALL context. Next, I will introduce some recent advances in corpus tools development that allow teachers and learners adopting the DDL approach to move beyond simple investigations of word and multi-word unit forms and functions. Some of these new tools allow us to probe language at the rhetorical and discourse level, and others allow us to see how people interact to create language. I will finish the presentation with some practical suggestions for integrating DDL into the CALL classroom and ideas for future CALL-based research projects that can inform and improve on current DDL practices.
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On

Sunday 1:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Sunday 1:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Build English skills and increase motivation with short films

Meiji University

Louise Ohashi, Show and tell Rm H3A Sunday 1:30 pm - 2:00 pm

This presentation shows how short films from the Internet can be used to boost English skills and learner motivation. A range of activities will be introduced, with audience members invited to actively participate and discuss potential adaptations that can be done to foster learning both in and out of class.
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This presentation shows how short films that are freely available on the Internet can be used to do activities that help students work on the four base skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing), assist with receptive and productive vocabulary development, and boost motivation. The films that will be introduced are all under four minutes in length and have no or very little spoken language. A range of activities will be introduced in the presentation, with audience members invited to actively participate in some of the demonstrations and discuss potential adaptations that can be done to foster learning in both classroom and out-of-class settings. The activities that will be introduced have been used by the presenter in university-level English classes in Japan. Informal feedback from students in class discussions and their English self-study reports suggest that the use of films had a positive impact, with students perceiving a wide range of learning benefits. Furthermore, they reported feeling motivated when using films in class, which prompted many of them to do self-selected tasks outside of class using films they had already seen or others that were recommended. This presentation introduces activities that can be adapted to suit a wide range of proficiency levels, but has less to offer for beginners so is recommended for teachers at high school level and above.
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Sunday 1:30 pm - 2:00 pm

How making short videos brought my class back from the dead

Okayama Prefecture University

Tony Brunelli, Show and tell Rm H3E Sunday 1:30 pm - 2:00 pm

This presentation discusses how active learning changed a low-level conversation class without conversation into an engaging and fun learning experience. Faced with unmotivated students in class the presenter will outline his trials and tribulations toward getting students to actively speak and participate in class by having them make short videos.
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This show and tell presentation discusses how active learning changed a conversation class without conversation into an engaging and fun learning experience. Teaching 2nd-year low proficiency learners for the first time, the presenter prepared what he thought was an interesting syllabus and class plan. However, when he was faced with unmotivated and almost completely unresponsive students in class he needed to revise his plan and find a way to stimulate language production. Starting with an overview of the first semester problem, the presenter will outline his trials and tribulations on his journey toward getting students to actively speak and participate in class by having them make short videos. The levels of motivation and English engagement increased as the teacher spent time with each individual small group, working together on the idea, the script, and the treatment. But the presenter discovered that the most valuable, beneficial, and significant element of the communication process did not come from the filming of the videos themselves, but came during the editing of the videos where students and teacher were able to discuss together the best way to piece together the videos. This provided a chance for students to present their creative ideas in a relaxed and rather stress-free environment. At the end of the semester, teacher and students discussed the project and it was evident that students felt their learning motivation had increased and that making videos improved their English language confidence and advanced their technological competence.
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Sunday 1:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Long-term natural language acquisition using interactive e-learning

Eigo Live, LLC

Bob Brown, Show and tell Rm H3G Sunday 1:30 pm - 2:00 pm

www.eigolive.jp is an interactive e-learning website that was developed based on neurological studies that aims to ensure long-term, natural language acquisition. The presentation will introduce the theory behind this system and demonstrate how the theory is put into practice to provide a convenient and effective learning tool for busy students.
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www.eigolive.jp is an interactive e-learning website that was developed based on neurological studies that prove the importance of stimulating students’ Broca area of the brain to ensure long-term, natural language acquisition. This interactive system provides various situational listening, speaking, writing and Q & A activities, without showing written text, that enable students to naturally acquire language skills. Students actively stimulate their Broca’s area by listening, pronouncing, typing and choosing the correct answers to questions, without reading dialogs or scripts. Basic through Expert levels are available to help students acquire general English skills or prepare for standardized tests such as Eiken, TOEIC and TOEFL. Short courses for professionals can also help prepare adults to use English for careers in transportation, hospitality, retail and business. The presentation will introduce the theory behind the development of this system and demonstrate how the theory is put into practice to provide a convenient and effective learning tool for busy students.
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On

Sunday 1:30 pm - 2:40 pm

Sunday 1:30 pm - 2:40 pm

Learner Development SIG forum: Language learners in the digital age

Tamagawa University

Blair Barr, Brett Milliner, Workshop Rm H2B Sunday 1:30 pm - 2:40 pm

The Learner Development Forum at JALTCALL 2017 is an interactive event focused on learner growth. It will feature student-centered applications for online tests, digital flashcards, blogs, and video-sharing websites. Timed rounds of presentations will be followed by a discussion circle, giving participants the opportunity to reflect on the contents.
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This Learner Development SIG Forum at JALTCALL 2017 is an inclusive, participant-friendly event featuring ideas for integrating language learning technology in the classroom and beyond while maintaining the focus on the learner. In the computer- and mobile-assisted language learning classroom, it is easy to focus on computer applications as solely tools for teaching and easing the management of large groups of students. However, with this focus, teachers can easily lose sight of the individuals adopting these tools as autonomous learners both inside and outside of the class. In this forum, timed rounds of interactive presentations about language learners engaging with CALL tools such as online tests, digital flashcards, blogs, and video-sharing websites will be followed by a discussion circle. At this time, participants will be given an opportunity to reflect on the presentations while sharing their own research experiences, puzzles, and narratives about learner growth and language development through the use of technology.

Presentations:

Lee Arnold (Seigakuin University), Blogs as informal LMSs for class and course assignment contextualization and publication

Blair Barr & Brett Milliner (Tamagawa University), Online testing for learner feedback and development

David Gann (Tokyo University of Science), Card Trick Instructional Videos and Online Language Learning Resources for Rescuing a Dying Class

Daniel Hougham(Hiroshima University), Using Quizlet to promote learner development
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Sunday 1:30 pm - 2:40 pm

Gamification of vocabulary acquisition - Words & Monsters

Lexxica - DMP

Guy Cihi, Workshop Rm H2D Sunday 1:30 pm - 2:40 pm

What can we learn from popular mobile games to help us develop more motivating materials and experiences? What are the most popular game mechanics, and how are they used to increase dopamine, the neurotransmitter associated with motivation, attachment, and long-term memory. Come preview the new Words & Monsters vocabulary game.
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Each day, 500 million people spend 60-90 minutes playing addictive mobile games on their portable devices. What can we learn from these popular mobile games to help us create more compelling learning materials and classroom experiences? This presentation will summarize the key mechanics of popular puzzle-action, role-play adventure games, and demonstrate Paul Howard-Jones' findings on how and why specific types of game rewards increase the brain’s production of dopamine, a neurotransmitter associated with motivation, emotional attachment, and long-term memory. Attendees will also experience Words & Monsters, a new mobile game that automatically adjusts to each player's lexical needs and then teaches receptive comprehension of thousands of new high-frequency words over a very short time frame. The presentation will conclude with an open dialog about the advantages (and disadvantages) of gamifying language learning for students and teachers.
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On

Sunday 2:10 pm - 2:40 pm

Sunday 2:10 pm - 2:40 pm

Focusing on tasks in virtual worlds: Mixing virtual and physical space

Kindai University

Robert Swier, Paper Rm H3H Sunday 2:10 pm - 2:40 pm

Using Minecraft, this presentation will discuss the creation of effective communicative tasks for virtual worlds, and explore the potential for interplay between physical and virtual space in mixed learning environments. Practical issues that teachers may face when implementing mixed learning environments will also be discussed.
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Interest in virtual worlds as arenas for language acquisition is increasing, however existing literature has largely focused on Second Life and similar platforms that by design present numerous obstacles to easy modification of the environment by novices. In this study, we present a sociocultural analysis of learner interaction in Minecraft, a platform that makes modification by novices exceptionally easy. We implemented five communicative tasks designed to encourage learner autonomy and meaningful interaction. Four of the tasks incorporated a concrete non-linguistic goal that necessitated communicating effectively to bridge a gap in information, and one task incorporated a decision-making activity. All tasks required the participants to take consequential action in the virtual environment. The participants included 14 students at a Japanese university, and data was collected over 13 sessions of 90-minutes each through chat transcripts, pre- and post-study questionnaires, and post-study semi-structured interviews. The analysis will examine the ways in which the interaction was influenced by the technological tools, theoretical framework, and physical environment. We will discuss the potential for interplay between real and virtual space, as the learners in this study were physically in the same room during data collection, and could see and hear each other directly while operating avatars in the virtual space. Evidence indicates that the virtual space provided a real-time extension, rather than replacement, of the physical learning space. Finally, we will highlight issues that practitioners may face when implementing mixed learning environments that include virtual spaces.
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Sunday 2:10 pm - 2:40 pm

Innovation in digital sentence translation tasks

Kwansei Gakuin University

Oliver Rose, Show and tell Rm H3A Sunday 2:10 pm - 2:40 pm

In this presentation I will demonstrate several different apps and websites that can be used to give students sentence translation practice in more efficient, effective, and accountable ways, including resources and workflows for Quizlet, PhraseBot app, www.apps4efl.com and Google forms.
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Despite the various unique affordances of sentence translation activities for language acquisition, they have been ignored by native speaker teachers in language teaching for many years. This is partly due to the fact that sentence translation activities are often somewhat impractical for teachers to set, oversee and correct. In this presentation, however, I will demonstrate several different apps and websites that can be used to give students sentence translation practice in more efficient, effective, and accountable ways. I will share curated resources on Quizlet covering a wide range of levels and grammar points, which can also be used with the PhraseBot app and www.apps4EFL.com for different kinds of practice of varying degrees of difficulty. These tasks can be offered as self-study resources or set for homework, with student usage and progress accountable to the teacher in various ways. I will also show how Google forms can be used for conveniently carrying out formative or summative testing using sentence translation tasks.
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On

Sunday 2:50 pm - 3:20 pm

Sunday 2:50 pm - 3:20 pm

Expectations and reality: Preliminary findings from a digital literacies survey

Kanda University of International Studies

Jeremy Eades, Paper Rm H3B Sunday 2:50 pm - 3:20 pm

This presentation will discuss the findings from an end-of-year survey at a tertiary institution, assessing students digital literacy skills. The presenters will discuss preliminary findings, including which skills are commonly learned, and which require explicit instruction, as well as future directions for research.
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As digital devices become more common in the classroom, it's imperative that teachers not assume students' digital literacy skills when it comes to planning and creating coursework, even though many of the students entering tertiary institutions are considered “digital natives”. This presentation will investigate and discuss the findings from an end-of-year survey of nearly 400 freshmen at a foreign languages university in which all incoming students are required to have an iPad. The survey is designed to assess basic iPad literacy skills gained over the first year of university, as well as other digital skills commonly used in the classroom including spreadsheet, slideshow and word processing skills, and digital collaboration skills through different social networks and cloud sharing apps. The presenters will discuss preliminary results, including which digital literacy skills are commonly learned and which require explicit instruction, as well as potential implications for classrooms using iPads, and future directions for the survey and further research.
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Sunday 2:50 pm - 3:20 pm

Australian-Japanese Multimodal e-Books for Language and Cultural Exchange

Matsuyama University

Bruce Lander, Paper Rm H3E Sunday 2:50 pm - 3:20 pm

This presentation will demonstrate how a variety of multimodal technologies were utilized to create eBooks for exchange between high school students in Australia and Japan. Students worked in groups of 6 or 7 to produce cultural, digital stories about local and national customs using iPads.
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The way the younger generation actively learn inside and outside the classroom is very much influenced by the multimodal technologies they are currently adopting. The younger generation of today seem to be continually immersed in technology. The way in which they telecommunicate with each other also seems to change each year. However, for the most part, foreign language students in Japan use their devices to communicate together and often not in the target language. If technology is involved there is a far greater potential for authentic language learning exchange to occur with actual native speakers abroad.

This paper presentation will introduce a collaborative e-learning exchange project between high school students in Japan and Australia sponsored by the Australia-Japan Foundation. Students in Japan learning English, created 5 sets of multimodal digital stories introducing local and national cultural elements. Whereas students in Australia did the same, but in Japanese. All digital stories were exchanged every 2 months over the course of one academic year. Students in Australia provided feedback through an online wiki, whereas students in Japan did the same, but in Japanese. Student created eBooks were made with various forms of iPad apps including Comic Life, iMovie, PuppetPals, Tellagami and Book Creator for iPad. If you are interested in learning how to introduce more iPad apps that promote creativity and provide an excellent opportunity for language exchange with real, similar aged speakers, then please come to this presentation. Several samples of student created materials will be shown.
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Sunday 2:50 pm - 3:20 pm

Building and learning together with Quizlet

Tamagawa University

Blair Barr, Show and tell Rm H3D Sunday 2:50 pm - 3:20 pm

In this interactive show-and-tell style presentation, participants will learn about some engaging and enjoyable vocabulary learning activities using the digital flashcard tools of Quizlet.com. Participants will learn to build a variety of shared class sets, and then interact and play games with fellow participants using the co-created sets.
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Although digital flashcard technology has been with us for some time, Quizlet.com took this technology to a new level by introducing the interactive team game called Quizlet Live in 2016. In this game, learners can work together using their smartphones or other devices in a team race to identity target vocabulary. Although many teachers have caught on to the interactive benefits and motivational enthusiasm generated in the classroom with this tool, there are in fact several ways to get learners involved in the development of Quizlet flashcard sets to help deepen their own learning while supporting the learning of their peers. This presentation will demonstrate how to create flashcard sets containing translations, pictures, definitions, and gap sentences. In addition, the presenter will prepare some interactive demonstrations of the activities used over this past year that students have praised as both a valuable and engaging part of their vocabulary learning experience. You will also be shown how to create class sets, edit those sets, interact with those sets, and ultimately play games with fellow participants using the sets you will create as a group. Bring your smartphones, tablets, or laptops, and prepare to engage with vocabulary and your fellow participants in an increasing popular and enjoyable way.
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